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Things to see in Croatia
By Amy Adejokun Amy Adejokun Section editor

Landscapes

These are the colours of the Croatian landscape : the blue from the sea and the sky on the coasts, the green from the valleys and plains in the inland, the yellow from the great cereal fields of Slavonia and the grey from the mountain range that runs along the coast, from Rijeka in the North to Dubrovnik in the South. For those who enjoy preserved nature, Croatia also has seven National Parks. Four are on the continent and three on the islands.

Coasts

On the road, more than 495 miles separate the northern border with Slovenia from the southern border with Montenegro. This coastal road, which is known as the "Adriatic colossal road" is superb, winding or wide, but most of the time overlooking the sea and the islands. However, on paper, Croatia has 1,100 miles of continental coasts. That's easy, there are creeks and peninsulas all over the place.

Traditions

Croatia has exceptional architectural heritage thanks to its many Roman, Venetian and Austrian archaeological relics. Plus, Croatians have a strong artistic tradition that is anchored in their know-how. Indeed, the tie, one of the most worn articles of clothing around the world, came out of Croatia. A trend launched by the elegant Croatian Cavaliers under the reign of Louis VIII in the 17th century, it spread into Europe and then all over the world. In Croatia you can find ties decorated with typical Croatian patterns, like the Glagolitic alphabet. On the island of Pag, Paska Cipka (lace) is a very important art form that is transmitted from generation to generation. By strolling through the streets of the old town, you will be able to see the locals still carrying out this long and painstaking work. Another symbol of the national identity is represented by the very frequent traditional events that take place in the country. Celebrations, with parades of magnificent multicoloured traditional costumes, are held to celebrate the country's victory over the various enemies who have invaded it over the centuries. The Croatians are a strongly religious people and, as such, regularly put on dances and festivities to honour the patron saint of each town and village.