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Things to see in Burgundy
By Amy Adejokun Amy Adejokun Section editor

Enogastronomy

How can you talk about the Burgundy region and not say anything about the gastronomy? The culinary specialities here are what make the region so renowned. The people from Burgundy love to cook, eat, and mostly, to share. The cuisine is really varied and many of the dishes from here have become national specialities.

Dijon mustard, jambon persillé (seasoned ham terrine) and Burgundy escargot stuffed with garlic and parsley are culinary specialities renowned both in and outside of France. One of the most famous dishes is, of course, boeuf bourgignon, which is meat that is stewed in wine from the region with vegetables and various seasonings. In this region you will also find gougères, which are small cheese puffs made with comté cheese (or a number of others), and coq au vin served with mushrooms, bacon, carrots and onions. Other specialities include blackcurrants, which are used to make various liqueurs and kirs, and several types of cheese, like époisses and chaource.

The region is also famous for its wines, which go along splendidly with the local dishes. Côte de Nuits, Côte Chalonnaise, Mâconnais, Beaujolais and Chablis are some of the Grands Vins of Bourgogne, as is Côte de Beaune, which is the ideal accompaniment for boeuf bourguignon. The sauces from this region are also quite renowned, such as the Dijon-style sauce made with mustard, or the one made with Chablis wine.

Finally, it is important to know that some of the biggest French chefs come from the region, like Bernard Loiseau and Guy Savoy.

Bourgogne is thus a special place for its many delicious specialities made with top quality beef and ideal for enjoying with some of the local wine.

Landscapes

Located in central France, Burgundy lies half-way between Paris and the French Alps. Although it may have some fair-sized towns/cities like Auxerre and Dijon, the rest of the region is relatively rural and its countryside is a lovely place to discover. In the middle of the region, straddling the four departments it is comprised of, the Morvan massif rises up 900m. The rest of the Burgundy territory varies between small valleys and plains. Let's also not forget the hundreds of mile of canals that wind through the region and the vineyards that cover a large part of its rural landscapes.

Arts and culture

Burgundy is not lacking in cultural activities. There are plenty of museums that abound in information on the local heritage and cultures. Such is the case of the Museum of Art and History in Clamecy and the Museum of Art and Archaeology in Cluny. Between a visit of the Castle of Saint Fargeau and the Abbey of Fontenay, you can stop at Vézelay, on the Way of St. James. Finally, Burgundy is a land where wine has been an integral part of the local culture for centuries. It will be hard to escape visiting a winery or estate that produces some of the best wines in Europe.