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The mysterious case of Canada's spotted lake
Posted on 19/01/2017 Modified on 27/02/2017

NatureCanada

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Not far from the city of Osoyoos in Canada hides an extremely unique lake. Kliluk, or the Spotted Lake, changes with the seasons in the most surprising of ways.

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  • Canada's spotted lake
    Canada's spotted lake

    Lake Kliluk is a sacred place for the native Indian tribe of Canada's Okanagan Valley.

  • Lake Kliluk, Canada
    Lake Kliluk, Canada

    The waters of the lake are said to be both healing and therapeutic.

  • Changing colours
    Changing colours

    Its waters contain a unique blend of minerals, including magnesium sulfate, calcium, sodium, silver and titanium, which change colour with the seasons.

  • Walk amongst the water
    Walk amongst the water

    The best time to see it is from June to September when, in the heat of the summer, water levels drop to reveal a network of walkways between the colourful basins.

  • Healing properties
    Healing properties

    The lake, easily visited from the town of Osoyoos, is now the property of the indigenous people of Canada's Okanagan Valley.

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Lake Kliluk is a sacred place for the native Indian tribe of Canada's Okanagan Valley. One of the many legends it has spawned tells the tale of a bloody battle between neighbouring tribes, whose leaders decided to declare a truce in order to allow the wounded to bathe in the waters of the lake, said to be both healing and therapeutic. In reality the waters of this rather spectacular spotted lake contain a unique blend of minerals, including magnesium sulfate, calcium, sodium, silver and titanium.

Each season brings with it a change in the lake's colour, but the best time to see it is from June to September when, in the heat of the summer, water levels drop to reveal a network of walkways between the colourful basins.

Unsurprisingly the lake's beauty and naturally restorative powers have left it at the centre of more than one land dispute. Used as a mineral mine during World War II, it then passed into the ownership of the family of Ernest Smith, who tried and failed to turn it into a spa in 1979. It took him 20 years to agree to sell it back to the area's indigenous people, for the generous price of $720,000.

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