Posted on 20/11/2021

#Guide #Portugal

Bucket list of things to do in Algarve

Bucket list of things to do in Algarve - © DaLiu / Shutterstock

With incredible weather, sandy beaches, breathtaking scenery of cliffs made up of limestone, and a flurry of small rural towns, reminders of a bygone era, Algarve is one of the jewels of Portugal. Located on the Southern coast of the country, the region is today one of Europe's most stunning locations and one of the most sought out destinations by tourists.

Praia da Marinha, or Marinha Beach is one of the most picturesque landscapes in Portugal and even Europe. With its numerous cliffs towering over the beautiful blue sea of the Atlantic Ocean, the Portuguese beach is a sight to behold. Only located ten minutes away from another breathtaking spot, the Benagil Caves, Marinha Beach is a little-known spot despite its beauty. 


With pitch-perfect weather all year round, Marinha Beach is an ideal destination no matter the season. At low tide, you'll even be able to explore its wonderful creeks hidden around its numerous limestone cliffs.

Loule's Market

Loule's Market

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Only located a few kilometres away from the city of Fero, Loulé is a small but authentic Portuguese market town and a popular destination for a day trip in Algarve. The city is quite unique in the area with its colourful historic centre and lively market. 


But the main attraction of the small town is its Arabian-inspired covered market. Most of the time quiet, apart from the few tourists coming in every now and then, Loulé truly comes alive on Sunday mornings when the city centre's streets become the busiest around. Stalls full of fresh products and regional handicrafts, Loulé's Market is full of little gems that cannot be found anywhere else. If you're wondering what to do at the end of your weekend in Algarve, this is the place to be.

Albufeira

Albufeira

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Sometimes called the ?Portuguese Saint-Tropez? has been often deemed as unauthentic by travellers and locals alike. However, its old city centre retains all the charm of Portuguese fisher towns. Paved streets, traditional and colourful houses, bars and animated restaurants, Albufeira has everything you'd want in a traditional Portuguese little town.


The area of Montechoro is particularly striking with its white houses and jasmine scent. But at night, it becomes the street for younger and older generations alike to meet and party all night. With cheap beers, good people and live music, Albufeira's atmosphere is everything you'd expect in the Iberian Peninsula.

Lagos Old Town

Lagos Old Town

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Historical and one of the most famous coastal towns of Portugal, Lagos possesses a rich maritime history and a coastline made up of natural and spectacular landscapes. Today, it's one of the most popular destinations in Algarve with its scenic beaches and animated nocturnal night.


Lagos has managed to preserve its unique atmosphere and charm through its city centre. With its old walls, small and cosy buildings and cobblestone streets, the Old Town of Lagos is a literal time machine sending you back to the 15th-16th century. At the time, Lagos was the centre of Europe's slave trade and numerous of its historical buildings are a reflection of that fascinating yet deeply troubling history.

Benagil Caves

Benagil Caves

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Benagil is a tiny fishing village on the south coast of Algarve, a few kilometres away from Praia da Marinha. It earned its international reputation thanks to its breathtaking sea caves. Located between the famous Praia do Carvoeiro et Armação de Pêra, Benagil has been for a long time one of the preferred destinations for tourists wanting to enjoy the summer heat and explore the numerous caves formed over the centuries around the village.

Arco da Vila

Arco da Vila

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One of the most emblematic monuments of Faro and of the whole region of Algarve. Arco da Vila (or City Arch) was one of Faro's Morrish waterfront gateways. The monument was created by Italian architect Francisco Xavier Fabri and was inaugurated in 1812.


Its architecture is a telling example of the legacy of Italian neoclassicism in Algarve but also a testament to Muslims influence dating back to the conquest of the Iberica Peninsula by the Arabic Empire. Inside, you can still see the Arabic Gate, which used to be part of the old Muslim walls that were used as city entrances for the people arriving by sea. Arco da Vila remains one of the rare examples of Arabic architecture in Portugal.