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Northern Lights: when to go see them?
Posted on 08/08/2013 , Modified on 20/07/2015

NatureIceland

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Scientists predict that due to a solar peak at the end of the year, the natural phenomenon usually visible from Iceland, Greenland and the north of Sweden, Finland, Norway, Canada,

Scientists predict that due to a solar peak at the end of the year, the natural phenomenon usually visible from Iceland, Greenland and the north of Sweden, Finland, Norway, Canada, Alaska and Russia, will be amplified. This means that chances of seeing the spectacle of the skies will be greatly increased. Strong sightings are set to continue this winter and into the winter of 2014/2015, according to NASA scientists as reported by The Telegraph.

What are Northern Lights?

Northern Lights, also known as 'Aurora Borealis', which is the scientific name for the phenomenon and is the name for the Roman goddess of dawn, occur when solar particles enter the Earth's atmosphere and on impact emit burning gases that produce different coloured lights (oxygen produces green and yellow; nitrogen blue). A similar spectacle in the southern hemisphere is known as the aurora australis.

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- More on the Northern Lights in Greenland.
- Events not to miss: Northern Lights in Iceland.