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The 15 most accident-prone airlines of the year
Posted on 16/10/2014 , Modified on 20/09/2017

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2014 may not be over yet, but this year's blacklist of the world's most dangerous airlines has already been published.

Lion Airlines

Lion Airlines
© Nuttapong / 123RF

This small Indonesian airline, specialising in low-cost flights, covers a network of 50 domestic routes out of Jakarta. Since 4 December 2012, it has featured on Europe's official Airline Blacklist due to several serious incidents. Most recently, in April 2013 one of the company's Boeing 737s missed its landing at Bali Airport and ended up in the ocean which borders the runway.

Vietnam Airlines

Vietnam Airlines
© Rebius / 123RF

Vietnam's national airline provides domestic and international flights from its two main bases in Ho-Chi-Minh-Ville and Hanoi. Since its launch, the company's fleet has had numerous accidents, with fatalities on three of its flights in 1988, 1992 and 1997. The most recent incident came in October 2010 when a Boeing 777 hit an air pocket over Russia, injuring 33 people on board.

Even though air travel has a reputation for being the safest mode of transport in the world, it nonetheless has its share of horrifying accidents. The number of deaths may be quite small in relation to the number of passengers, but a plane crash has catastrophic costs, both human and financial. Located in Germany, the Jet Airliner Crash Data Evaluation Centre is responsible for collecting all sorts of information relating to plane crashes and has been recording incidents since the beginning of commercial flying in the 1920s. The list that follows is its latest, rather startling blacklist.

Today, the internet allows us to compare airlines from all over the world with a couple of clicks. We can assess their level of security, compare their prices or simply find out the times of their flights. But you can never be too careful, seeing as some of the companies listed here don't actually figure on the European Union's black list. Yes, there's even worse out there!

China Airlines

China Airlines
© Teddyleung / 123RF

Not to be confused with Air China, China Airlines is Taiwan's national airline. Based at Taiwan Taoyuan Airport, it serves over 100 destinations in Asia, Europe, America and Oceania. Since 1970, the company has registered a rate of 716 accidents per million flights, whereas the world average is less than one...

Air India

Air India
© Philip Lange / 123RF

As its name would suggest, this company is the national airline of India. The company's famous logo is a centaur and its 101 planes serve 80 destinations, 50 of which are domestic routes. The airline's latest catastrophe to date came in May 2010 when a Boeing 737 en route from Dubai to Mangalore crashed after having missed the landing strip, leaving less than eight of its charges alive.

TAM Airlines

TAM Airlines
© Leonard Zhukovsky / 123RF

As well as its 45 flights to Brazilian cities, TAM Linhas Aéreas flies to 16 international destinations, including direct daily services from Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro to London Heathrow. On 17 July 2007, an A320 missed the runway at Sao Paulo, killing 180 passengers and six crew members. It is to this day the second most serious plane accident in Latin America's history.

Garuda Indonesia

Garuda Indonesia
© Bayu Harsa / 123RF

Taking its name from a bird in Hindu mythology, this fleet of 116 planes covers Asia, Australia, the Middle East and Europe. One of its Boeing 737s was involved in a major accident in 2007 when it caught fire after departing from Jakarta, killing 22 passengers.

GOL Transportès Aéreos

GOL Transportès Aéreos
© RODRIGO PETTERSON/ITSPRESS/GAMMA

Founded in 2001, this Brazilian airline has transported more than 16 million passengers, mostly on domestic flights. In September 2006, one of the fleet's Boeings hit another plane in mid-air and crashed in the middle of the Amazon Rainforest with 149 passengers on board.

Saudia

Saudia
© Rebius / 123RF

Based in Jeddah, this Saudi Arabian airline sends its planes all over the world, including the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Europe and North America. With regard to the on-board service, the company respects Islamic religious practice on all of its flights, including the omission of alcohol and pork from the in-flight menu.

Korean Air

Korean Air
© Rebius / 123RF

'Excellence in Flight' is the slogan of South Korea's national airline, which offers flights to 121 destinations via its base in Seoul. Unfortunately, since its creation in 1962 the fleet has had a rather turbulent history and has already registered nine accidents, including one in 1997 which cost the lives of 228 passengers.

Turkish Airlines

Turkish Airlines
© Markus Mainka / 123RF

From its main hub in Istanbul, Turkish Airlines serves over 200 destinations all over the world. Despite being named the company with the best in-flight food between 2011 and 2014, the airline is also known for sadder reasons. Its international flights have had three major accidents, with the most recent in 2009 when a rough landing at Amsterdam Airport killed nine people and injure

Scandinavian Airlines

Scandinavian Airlines
© Markus Mainka / 123RF

This Swedish airline owns 134 planes and runs services from its three main bases in Stockholm, Copenhagen and Oslo. In 2001, one of its planes, a McDonnell Douglas, caused the death of 110 people on board due to a collision on the runway at Milan Airport.

Asiana Airlines

Asiana Airlines
© Sufi70 / 123RF

This Korean airline serves more than 15 million travellers a year and offers 106 possible destinations. Since its launch in 1988 as the rival company to Korean Air, its planes have had three major accidents. The most recent to date was in 2013 when a plane overshot its approach to San Francisco Airport, causing numerous losses of life and huge damage.

China Southern Airlines

China Southern Airlines
© Guo Zhonghua / 123RF

This airline, based in Canton, is the largest and most developed in China, with a fleet of over 300 planes. It offers 320 routes, including the most comprehensive network in mainland China. But the airline has already had a number of accidents. In 1992, 141 people lost their lives when a Boeing 737 crashed into the mountains in China's Guilin region.

Thai Airways International

Thai Airways International
© Fedor Selivanov / 123RF

The national airline of Thailand runs daily flights between London Heathrow and Bangkok in a Boeing 737. It has registered six accidents over the years, the two worst of which happened in Nepal in 1992 and in Thailand in 1998. In both cases, the planes were destroyed and hundreds of passengers lost their lives.

Japan Airlines

Japan Airlines
© Eric Broder Van Dyke / 123RF

Since 1951, this Japanese airline has been operating international flights over four continents from its numerous bases. On 12 August 1985, one of the airline's Boeing 737s had a tragic accident near to Mount Osutaka, just over 60 miles from Tokyo. 520 people were killed, making it the biggest loss of life on a single plane.