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Dublin
Dublin

Ireland condensed into a single city

Dublin in short

Friendly and welcoming, Ireland's capital is a far cry from its European counterparts, where anonymity reigns supreme. Here, people bump into each other, smile, say hello and even exchange a few words on a street corner. This undoubtedly stems for the city’s cult of the pub, where everybody comes together at the end of the day to chat over a good pint, whether it be dark, blond or even red! What matters isn’t the colour of the beer, but the company you drink it in.

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All the better if you’re guzzling a Guinness, though! A drink that’s more than just a drink, this iconic beer was born in the streets of Dublin and has been an indelible part of its economic renaissance since the country won independence. Thus, a visit to Dublin would be incomplete without a trip to the Guinness Storehouse, an old brewery since converted into a museum-cum-temple devoted to this quintessentially Irish brew. Guinness is proof that all you need to write a legend is three ingredients, namely barley, hops, and brewer’s yeast, and that the secret to immortality isn’t in the materials, but in the technique and tradition.

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If Dublin has carved its identity from its pub culture and the warm-spiritedness that emanates from its bars, it is just as (or perhaps more) important to keep in mind that Dublin is almost unrivalled in terms of culture and history, even if only quietly. Oscar Wilde, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Bernard Shaw, Jonathan Swift and countless other literary greats had their careers forged among the quaint city streets and the oscillatingly moody and radiant atmosphere that are so signature of the Irish capital. To fully tap into this singular history visit Trinity College, Ireland’s oldest and most prestigious university which was founded in 1592 by colonial ruler Queen Elizabeth I.

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The neo-classical facades of the university’s buildings reflect and accentuate the stern air that hangs over the campus. To visit the university is to walk in the footsteps of the many personalities who have left their mark on its halls, the writers, painters, and revolutionaries who have always been the institution’s soul.

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The must-sees

All the must-sees

How to get there?

The city of Dublin is easily accessible thanks to its international airport connected to many European airlines, especially from major British cities.

But, remember, there are also countless ferries to choose from! Ideal if you are planning a road trip.

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Where to stay?

Dublin has a wide range of accommodations to offer. From city-centre hotels to budget hostels, there's something for everyone. Staying in the city centre is the best way to make the most of the city and its tourist attractions. It also makes it easy to get out and about on foot. As is the case for many European capitals, nightly prices are higher than in the rest of the country, but remain reasonable, depending on what the travellers are looking for.

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Practical information

Visiting Dublin

The best way to get the most out of Dublin is the Dublin Pass, which gives you free entry to over 30 tourist sites and more than 25 special offers, including queue-jumps. Packages are available for 1, 2, 3 or 6 days.

Best period

The saying that "there are the four seasons in one day in Ireland" isn't that false. And Dublin is no exception to the rule. To liken your chances of enjoying the city while staying dry, it's best to visit between May and September, when temperatures are highest and sunshine is at its peak! But be careful, you may still be lucky to experience a little refreshing rain here and there, so remember to carry an umbrella at all times.

Safety

There's nothing to worry about when visiting Dublin. However, as with many of Europe's tourist capitals, there are certain reflexes you should have when travelling, such as keeping your papers and money on your person and being vigilant in busy tourist areas.

What to eat

When you're in Dublin, you must try a yummy fish & chips - a pub classic! However, there are more typical dishes to uncover, such as Irish stew, served with meat or fish, or Guinness pie, which, as its name suggests, has Guinness in its list of ingredients. Guinness gives a unique and delicious flavour to this stew-based dish. This dish can be found on the menu of almost every pub in the city. Make sure to enjoy it in a warm and friendly atmosphere!

What to bring back?

A crowd favourite are objects or clothing stamped with the logo and colours of Guinness. Another famous Dublin beverage is Jameson, which can also be found in many souvenir shops. And let's not forget all things Irish, such as sheep and harp logos, which can be found on many trinkets: mugs, magnets, bags, scarves, etc.

What to see around Dublin

While Dublin is home to a large amount of tourist attractions, it is also possible to do some great sightseeing outside of the city, particularly in the Wicklow mountains, offering a breathtaking, rolling countryside. A wonderful break from the hustle and bustle of the city!

Less than 100 km south of Dublin is the charming village of Glendalough. Hidden away in the hills, this is where the more adventurous can go hiking, as a dozen paths surround the site. Glendalough is an opportunity to discover Ireland's ancestral lands, just an hour from the capital!

Documents and visa

As a UK citizen, you will need a valid passport to enter Ireland.

Language

English is the official language in Ireland, although Gaelic is still widely spoken.

Currency

As Ireland is part of the European Union, its official currency is the euro.

lightbulb_outline Editor's tip

If you wish to stay exclusively in Dublin during your stay, you don't need a car. Dublin's transport network is particularly well-developed. Getting around the city on foot is also very pleasant.

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